46 Comments

Tomas, this is such a great article, and right up my street. One thing that I love is also how different things appear if you play with the orientation of maps—like turning them upside down or sideways. I remember seeing a map of the UK upside down but with all the names turned as well, so that it read legibly but was utterly unsettling to look at. Also, I recall a map of the Mediterranean but with Gibraltar at the north and Turkiye at the south. Fascinating.

Thanks for your great work. I always enjoy it and just subscribed.

Best wishes

Jolyon

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Apr 20, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

The visualizations for the distances were academically and graphically sweet!

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And yes, big countries are big. Canada is closer to Moscow, London, and Paris than some parts of Canada are to Toronto and Montreal.

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These illustrations and commentary are über fantastic and mind blowing terrific.

Thank you, thank you, a million thank yous for sharing this magnificent graphics and information data. My hat goes off to Unchartered Territories — You are simply the best

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Apr 20, 2023·edited Apr 20, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Yep, Mercator really makes Europe, Russia, and Canada (all in the far north) much bigger than they are and Africa much smaller than it is. That's why everyone should teach their kids geography with a globe.

BTW, Japanese maps still put Japan in the center of the map. There's no good reason to divide along the Pacific than the Atlantic so it's a stylistic choice that probably differs by country.

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Apr 22, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Outstanding explanation Tomas. Let's challenge the conventional wisdom. It's old, colonized, discriminatory. Thanks for brining this up.

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Apr 21, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Maps? Yes! Any and all sort, too numerous and random (besides the usual US centered Mercator) to praise/laugh/cry/catatonically stare at throughout my pitiful life as a map junkie. The lack of will to not look has taken it's toll, but enough about me. Epic slice of geography porn, sir, clever finale' - jolly good show!

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Apr 21, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Is anyone agitating against the use of Mercator projections? Especially on a TV news story, they could show a spinning globe instead. I see lots of examples of how people really believe the Mercator version. For example, a glass paperweight with Alaska & Greenland along the equator & Africa small, toward the south pole.

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Apr 20, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

This was a very entertaining article. I'll be sure to forward it to a good friend and former professor of geography.

When I finished it and saw the footnotes, I didn't bother to look for them in the text because it would be a bit tedious.

Wouldn't it be nice if footnotes had a "hot-link" that connected a note to the source of that note?

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Dec 23, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Real orientation of the Panama canal really made me think of my distortioned mind... 😜 ... Will get myself a good old backlit globe. It makes much more sense. At least at home.

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Nov 13, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Great presentation. Among many other things, it drives home the size of Pacific Ocean. That, when combined with the distances involved, explains why it took Western explorers well into the Nineteenth Century to fully explore the Pacific.

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thanks for doing this. loved this piece!

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Jun 21, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

these distortions have real economic implications!

see: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.34.1.196

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May 13, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Peter's projection

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Apr 27, 2023Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Tchaikovsky wrote a good book about an octopus civilisation... and really great to see (discussions of) a world map that not only doesn't forget, but even mentions New Zealand... :D

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lovely work

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