102 Comments

Thank you, Tomas, for your thoughtful analysis. With all the near-term reporting on this war in the media you add tremendous value by presenting a nuanced case. I think this is the first time I’ve seen such a thoughtful analysis of the challenges in Gaza. You don’t condone in any way what Hamas is doing, yet you manage to help us see what is driving their evil actions. Understanding your enemy is essential in good strategy, and I appreciate your work in helping us do just that.

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Oct 20Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Tomas,

Am an avid yet silent reader on this series, because I dont know much about either side. Since you will cover Israel in this next article, could you touch upon why Jews have faced so much persecution historically ? Its hard for me to understand why one group of people should consistently face so much hatred and persecution for thousands of years.

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Oct 19Liked by Tomas Pueyo

An excellent article. My own impression from travels and talks in both Israel and Palestine is that there’s no solution to this conflict. When 80% of both Israelis and Palestinians believe that exterminating the enemy is the only solution, and that their God will assist them in that, they’ll keep on killing each other. This Holy Land is so tiny and can’t be divided into two independent states.. In the long run this will be a desert and the few inhabitants that remain will be ruled by a secular state which treats everybody alike.

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Oct 24Liked by Tomas Pueyo

As an Israeli I find this summary very close to the truth. I sympathize with Palestinians and I wish they find a way out of this trap (In Israel some people including me call it "self victimization"). I wish I knew what can I as an Israeli individual can do to help them.

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Oct 19Liked by Tomas Pueyo

There have been a few articles over the years about Israeli theft of water, particularly in the West Bank, for illegal settlements and Israeli farms. Water is a critical resource in short supply (supplemented by desalination). Israelis use much more per day than Palestinians. Eliminating competition may play a part in the disproportionate response to Hamas's attacks.

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Let me find it. It had a red background with a man if the right forefront, black balding hair and glasses. It had the MEMRI logo in the upper right hand corner. I clicked over to see the video sources. I'll post a response as soon as I do locate it.

I covered Gaza from 2004 - 2014, so I know the perils of reporting this. The propaganda is thick on both sides, but this is the worst I've ever seen. It is really, really bad.

Oh yeah. Further down in the comments you said the Israelis (The Jerusalem Fund if my memory serves was the name of the group) bought land from Palestinians leading up to 1948. That is true— 7% was all they could buy. They couldn't make that work and the Nakba followed.

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Thomas, I understand the passion here. My question is why did you include a video from MEMRI? They are 100% hasbara, with strong ties to the Israeli government and a known disinformation distributor amongst academics, researchers and veteran reporters. Nobody who has covered this issue for any length of time will use them as a resource. What including them does is raise a red flag on the reporting with people experienced in this issue.

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Oct 19·edited Oct 19Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Thank you, Tomás, for such an insightful piece. Looking forward to read the part on Israel in the coming weeks.

I hope you will also dedicate time to an overseen, but extremely important fact: The Palestine people are currently divided in two regions and two governments: Hamas rules Gaza, and Fatah (or the Palestinian Authority) rules (part of) the West Bank. Somehow, and in a very imperfect and unbalanced way, Fatah has been able to survive with Israeli intervention and little violence. When one reads about the structure of the Palestine Authority government, it sounds much more like a country, than what Hamas is doing in Gaza.

Just like Israelis are currently divided, so are Palestinians, and Fatah seems to be able to coexist better with Israel than Hamas. Maybe a path to a less violent coexistence runs through the Palestine Authority and Fatah? Both Western and Arab countries provide some money (not as much as needed) to the Palestine Authority/Fatah because they have agreed to create a government as close as possible to Western standards, while Hamas lost any economic support from the West due to their terrorist activity.

Countries like Iran, Russia, China will always be willing to support Hamas or other terrorist groups either overtly or covertly. Instead of spending energy and money trying to kill Hamas, why not spend more energy and money trying to strengthen the imperfect, but better model of Fatah? I hope you cover this topic in more detail.

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Oct 19Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Nice. But boy, oh boy... At least try to hide a little bit your bias in favor of Israel man... But I respect that you literally admit it in the "Palestinain narrative"... Okay, let me do my version, but from the Israeli point of view:

"I believe I'm descendant from the Canaanite peoples that belived in only one God, called Yahwe.

They createtd several Kindoms like Judea or Israel.

Then they were expelled by several civilizations.

So, jews were spread around the world like rats. I don't believe any jew stayed in their land and just adopted the new empire's culture (be it Romans, be it Arabs). So I don't belive palestinains are descendants from jews. I cannot fathom it.

Well, let's come back to modern times.

In the 1800s europeans were crazy about science, categorization, classification, etc. They invented nationalism. Every Nation has a State.

My Ashkenazi jews were jealous about this new countries witn strong nationalities being built around Nation, culture.

Plus, europeans belived in races. Jews were an inferior race. Europeans hated jews. So some jews saw it as a good idea to create an independent country for the Jews.

In the early 1900s an important english guy sent a letter to an even more powerful jewish guy which proclaimed that Jews had the right the f* off from Europe and go procalim a new Nation-STate on top of the land they recently acquired. It says that they should always respect the integrity of the "NON-JEWSIH MINORITIES" (hahahah) that existed in the land.

Zionism was going well. My grandparents were very astute, they masterfully exploited this situation.

Nowadays, everyone has accpeted the occupation of Israel. Even though we try and try to be seen by the world as the victims, we can't do it properly...

So maybe now we should just own it, we should say "yeah, we won. We are stronger than you arabs. It sucks, but we won't go anywhere and if we can get more land we will do so. We see that even commiting war crimes gets very easily under the rug, so, if we can, we will...

I dOn'T kNoW wHy ArAbS hAtE uS... ThEy ArE aNtIsEmItIc...

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Oct 19Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Have you talked to any Hamas representative? Have you sit and chatted with a young Hamas fighter? How are you so confident about their intentions? You keep saying they don't want peace with Israel. After all, they are people you know? Not just savages. Also, since you started by sharing videos of attrocities made by Hamas mercenaries, you could also have added testimonies of how some israelis were treated humanly by Hamas fighters. Not all of them ignore the teachings of Islam, some have applied the teachings of their book by only targeting soldiers (the few that were present in those areas, for some reason).

Another question. Do you know if those Hamas soldiers that entered Israel returned to Gaza? I presume they were shot and killed by the IDF? Or did they wait for them to return to Gaza so that way they can bomb them behind the human shields they use?

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Oct 19Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Excellent writings Tomas!

Perhaps the only thing you didn't indicate was "why" it was so easy for Hamas to enter this normally impenetrable fort called Israel?

It looks strange that it seemed so simple to cross the so protected border.

Thanks again for your writings!!

Dennis

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Oct 19Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Remarkable analysis, I think it's just spot on!

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Oct 24Liked by Tomas Pueyo

Concerning being a "client state" of Israel. Yes, for a few years Gaza will be very economically dependent of Israel, but very quickly they can compete with Israeli ports with their cheaper labor, and they can industrialize Gaza itself, taking orders for manufacturing directly from Europe. This could start a virtuous cycle like the one that happened in east Asia.

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Oct 23Liked by Tomas Pueyo

"13. Hamas rejects all attempts to erase the rights of the refugees, including the attempts to settle them outside Palestine and through the projects of the alternative homeland."

I find this article interesting. Are there projects to find alternative homeland for some Palestinians? Are there some Palestinians who would be happy with this? What do the existing residents of these lands think about the proposals?

Thanks for writing this series. I am finding it very informative.

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Thank you for that analysis. Very interesting.

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Great reporting Tomas, thank you 🙏

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